Posted by: kerryl29 | December 15, 2016

Thematic Interruption: An Ongoing Celebration of the Mundane

I’ve said it before, more than once:  I take my photographic proclivities–the perspectives, the “eye,” if you will–everywhere I go.  After years of cutting my teeth on locales that effectively require an attention to creating order from chaos, even when I’m at places where grand scenics are virtually everywhere, I find my eye inevitably drawn to intimates.  While I’m attracted to the grand scene as much as the next person–as I believe my chronological travelogues demonstrate–I don’t simply jump from one of theses locations to the other.  I invariably seek out the details between grand scenic captures.

Pine Forest Color, Carroll County, New Hampshire

Pine Forest Color, Carroll County, New Hampshire

And so it was, yet again, during my time in New England this fall.  You’ve already seen evidence of that, particularly during my days in Maine, but it was every bit as much the case during my adventures in Vermont and New Hampshire as well.

Colors of Autumn, Essex County, Vermont

Colors of Autumn, Essex County, Vermont

This is now “a thing.”  While I’m aware of it, I’m not really consciously telling myself to “look for intimates” when I’m in the field.  It’s a firmly ingrained part of my in-field workflow at this stage.  I don’t have to try and find intimate shots; I simply do so, almost literally every time I’m in the field.

Maple Splendor, Essex County, Vermont

Maple Splendor, Essex County, Vermont

And I think it would be a big mistake for me to fight this embedded tendency.  It’s not causing me to miss grand opportunities–I believe I’ve demonstrated that with my posts.

Birches and Beeches, Long Pond Road, Orleans County, Vermont

Birches and Beeches, Long Pond Road, Orleans County, Vermont

Besides, fighting what is plainly a natural tendency would not only make me miss a lot of these more subtle intimate shots that I like so much; at this point, I think it would also produce a level of cognitive dissonance.  I’d have to work to not see these kinds of shots at this stage.

Roots and Leaves, Elephant Head Trail, Crawford Notch, White Mountain National Forest, New Hampshire

Roots and Leaves, Elephant Head Trail, Crawford Notch, White Mountain National Forest, New Hampshire

Besides, it’s pretty clear to me at this point that this is who I am as a photographer.  Why would I want to fight something that has emerged, organically?  Why would I want to suppress something that essentially defines me as (dare I say it?) an artist?

Birch Trunks, Easton Road, Grafton County, New Hampshire

Birch Trunks, Easton Road, Grafton County, New Hampshire

I think the answer, clearly, is “I wouldn’t.”  If this represents a semblance of the much-discussed, long-pondered personal style of photography (and I’m not at all certain that it does), then so be it.  And if it doesn’t…well, that’s okay too.

Maples and Birches, Crawford Notch, White Mountain National Forest, New Hampshire

Maples and Birches, Crawford Notch, White Mountain National Forest, New Hampshire

My tendency to analyze to death notwithstanding, I’ve more or less concluded that these are compositions I’m inclined to see and I like to produce them so…that’s what I do. 🙂  And I’m perfectly content with that conclusion.

Maples Leaves Intimate, Bear Notch Road, White Mountain National Forest, New Hampshire

Maples Leaves Intimate, Bear Notch Road, White Mountain National Forest, New Hampshire

The next post will return to the chronology of the trip with an account of my first full day based in the Vermont’s Northeast Kingdom.

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Responses

  1. I think it is well-documented that in this era of “everyone is a photographer” it is important to see differently. The ability to appreciate the details and to give us that perspective sets you apart.

    • Thanks, Ellen.

  2. Nice colours..

    • Thanks very much!

  3. Gorgeous! The new WP reader chopped your images in half!
    https://cindyknoke.com/2016/12/15/changes-to-wp-reader/

    • Thanks…I wasn’t aware of the change in the Reader presentation. I gather that there’s nothing to be done about it, unfortunately…

  4. Beautiful intimate scenes Kerry. I particularly enjoyed the roots and leaves image. Very well seen.

    • Thanks, Carol!

  5. Not everyone can “see” the patterns effectively in tree trunks and foliage to capture a good composition. Well seen!

    • Thanks, Jane!

  6. Every photo in this gallery is simply glorious. You ROCK, Kerry. 🙂

    • Wow…thanks, Frank!

  7. Kerry thank you for your amazing photos! They are a delight for the eyes. You capture nature in all its wondrous diversity. I hope you have a great Christmas season. I look forward to more of your photos in the new year. Blessings Roland Legge

    • Thanks very much, Roland! Have a great holiday season.


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