Posted by: kerryl29 | April 11, 2016

Majesty: A Canadian Rockies Retrospective

Since I first began taking dedicated photo trips 13 years ago this coming fall, I’ve been fortunate enough to see many beautiful places in North America, frequently under the best of circumstances.  During that time, I’ve never been anywhere that I found as captivating as the Canadian Rockies.  I was so taken with the region that I did something I’ve never done anywhere before:  I spent a total of four weeks there in consecutive years.  (I didn’t go there in the fall of 2014 with any expectation of returning in 2015, or, necessarily, ever.)

Two Jack Lake Sunrise, Banff National Park, Alberta

Two Jack Lake Sunrise, Banff National Park, Alberta

I returned from the most recent trip to the Rockies at the beginning of October of last year–nearly 6 1/2 months ago–and not a day goes by where I don’t reflect on the experience at least once.  A common theme has been to consider what my time in the Canadian Rockies has taught me…or, more accurately, of what has it reminded me?  Some of the points, I’ve concluded after much consideration, are photo-centric, but others are less tangible, and more existential, in nature.

Takkakaw Falls, Yoho National Park, British Columbia

Takkakaw Falls, Yoho National Park, British Columbia

 Time (And All Its Consequences)

From the narrow point of view of photographic success–however that’s defined–it’s important to give myself enough time to have a real chance to, in fact, succeed.  I’ve hinted at the importance of this axiom in the past, but it’s almost always easier said than done, particularly when traveling to a place as remote (at least from my home base) and as extensive as the Canadian Rockies.  There’s an inclination to try to cram in far more than is possible, let alone desirable, on such occasions and doing so does a real disservice to viable photographic opportunities.  An overwhelming percentage of the time, the best landscape photography is the product of immersion, exploration and the optimization of the best light–and other ambient conditions–for the subject matter.

Dance of the Aspens, Celestine Lake Road, Jasper National Park, Alberta

Dance of the Aspens, Celestine Lake Road, Jasper National Park, Alberta

But building in large blocks of time is expensive and/or logistically difficult for those of us who aren’t independently wealthy and retired.  Furthermore, time is inherently precious and limited, wherever and however one chooses to spend it.  There’s an inherent tension between the patience necessary to nurse the art and craft of on-site photography and the nagging sense that time is being “wasted.”  It’s a kind of opportunity cost; there’s an aching feeling that just around that bend or over that hill is something else, even more spectacular, to be seen and photographed and it will be missed if I don’t wrap up here and move on.  The more amazing the area is generally, the stronger the pull of this impulse…and it doesn’t get much more amazing than the Canadian Rockies.

Aspen Leaves and Rocks, Fireside Picnic Area, Banff National Park, Alberta

Aspen Leaves and Rocks, Fireside Picnic Area, Banff National Park, Alberta

I realized that I’ve become pretty adept at fighting this short-term impulse.  It’s not that I don’t feel it, because I certainly do.  But I’ve developed a pretty good sense, I think, of knowing when to resist, and let things play out where I am and when to cut bait and run.  It’s a product of experience in the field, I think, nothing more.

And, while I wish I had the wherewithal to take longer, more frequent trips, I’ve learned to recognize that I have reason to be grateful for the opportunities that are afforded me.  I never would have expected to have the chance to spend the equivalent of a month in the Canadian Rockies, but I have!

Elliott Peak from White Goat Lakes at Dawn, David Thompson Country, Alberta

Elliott Peak from White Goat Lakes at Dawn, David Thompson Country, Alberta

It’s Nice to Have Options

One of the best things about the Canadian Rockies is the remarkable flexibility that the region affords to photographers.  Not only is it a region that’s perpetually dripping with photographic potential almost literally everywhere you look, those prospects are manifested in so many different forms that there are almost no conditions that aren’t conducive to top flight opportunities.

Sunny days?  Head to the wide open spaces (of which there are many), with their associated grand landscapes, just begging to be captured.

Bow River Meadow, Banff National Park, Alberta

Bow River Meadow, Banff National Park, Alberta

Majestic Kootenay Plains Sunset, David Thompson Country, Alberta

Majestic Kootenay Plains Sunset, David Thompson Country, Alberta

Cloudy (with, perhaps a bit of light rain)?  Time to check out the creeks and waterfalls.

Beauty Creek Waterfall, Jasper National Park, Alberta

Beauty Creek Waterfall, Jasper National Park, Alberta

Mistaya Canyon, Banff National Park, Alberta

Mistaya Canyon, Banff National Park, Alberta

Tangle Falls, Jasper National Park, Alberta

Tangle Falls, Jasper National Park, Alberta

Or perhaps intimate forest scenes are more to your liking.

Muleshoe Picnic Area, Bow Valley Parkway, Banff National Park, Alberta

Muleshoe Picnic Area, Bow Valley Parkway, Banff National Park, Alberta

Aspen Forest, Celestine Lake Road, Jasper National Park, Alberta

Aspen Forest, Celestine Lake Road, Jasper National Park, Alberta

Isolated Aspens, Icefields Parkway, Banff National Park, Alberta

Isolated Aspens, Icefields Parkway, Banff National Park, Alberta

Or you can play with abstracts.

Saskatchewan River Abstract, Whirlpool Point, David Thompson Country, Alberta

Saskatchewan River Abstract, Whirlpool Point, David Thompson Country, Alberta

Athabasca Glacier Intimate, Columbia Icefields, Jasper National Park, Alberta

Athabasca Glacier Intimate, Columbia Icefields, Jasper National Park, Alberta

 

Or semi-abstracts.

Sunwapta River Rapids, Jasper National Park, Alberta

Sunwapta River Rapids, Jasper National Park, Alberta

Bow Falls, Banff National Park, Alberta

Bow Falls, Banff National Park, Alberta

Or take a turn with black and white renderings.

Athabasca River Black & White, Jasper National Park, Alberta

Athabasca River Black & White, Jasper National Park, Alberta

Consolation Lakes Black & White, Banff National Park, Alberta

Consolation Lakes Black & White, Banff National Park, Alberta

Mistaya Canyon & the Mistaya River Black & White, Banff National Park, Alberta

Mistaya Canyon & the Mistaya River Black & White, Banff National Park, Alberta

Or find those broad scenes that are appealing in color, despite the overcast skies.

Bow Lake and Crowfoot Mountain, Banff National Park, Alberta

Bow Lake and Crowfoot Mountain, Banff National Park, Alberta

Larch Valley, Banff National Park, Alberta

Larch Valley, Banff National Park, Alberta

Fog or mist?  Or low-hanging clouds?  The Rockies have you covered.

Rampart Ponds Black & White, Banff National Park, Alberta

Rampart Ponds Black & White, Banff National Park, Alberta

Ten Peaks at Sunrise, Moraine Lake, Banff National Park, Alberta

Ten Peaks at Sunrise, Moraine Lake, Banff National Park, Alberta

Foggy Trees, Yoho Valley Road, Yoho National Park, British Columbia

Foggy Trees, Yoho Valley Road, Yoho National Park, British Columbia

Pyramid Mountain from Patricia Lake at Sunrise, Jasper National Park, Alberta

Pyramid Mountain from Patricia Lake at Sunrise, Jasper National Park, Alberta

Sometimes, you can break every single stinking rule…and be happy that you did.

Hungabee Lake Outlet Stream, Opabin Plateau, Yoho National Park, British Columbia

Hungabee Lake Outlet Stream, Opabin Plateau, Yoho National Park, British Columbia

Wapta Falls Black & White, Yoho National Park, British Columbia

Wapta Falls Black & White, Yoho National Park, British Columbia

This kind of locational flexibility is a rare thing.  My time in the Canadian Rockies reminded me just how valuable it is.

Solitude

At even the very busiest locations in the Canadian Rockies, solitude is just a few minutes walk away.  From crowds to utter bliss in a matter of seconds.

Another tourist bus has disgorged its payload at the Peyto Lake overlook at Bow Summit?  Just walk a few hundred yards up the trail and soak up the silence (not to mention the view).

Peyto Lake from Bow Summit, Banff National Park, Alberta

Peyto Lake from Bow Summit, Banff National Park, Alberta

Athabasca Falls is (to paraphrase Darwin Wiggett) the rough equivalent of a crowd at a Rolling Stones concert?  Wander up the virtually unused riverside trail, above the falls for two minutes and you’ll feel as though you’re in the wilderness.

Athabasca River Black & White, Jasper National Park, Alberta

Athabasca River Black & White, Jasper National Park, Alberta

Too many people hanging around the rock pile at Moraine Lake for your tastes?  Head up the easily traversed lakeside trail, and in two minutes you’ll be all alone.

Moraine Lake Morning, Banff National Park, Alberta

Moraine Lake Morning, Banff National Park, Alberta

Really want to get away?  Head east for about 20 minutes from Saskatchewan Crossing on Highway 11 and find yourself in the biggest of big sky countries–the Kootenay Plains–just steps off the pavement.

Kootenay Plains, David Thompson Country, Alberta

Kootenay Plains, David Thompson Country, Alberta

Why I Do this in the First Place

There’s a tendency, when photographing, to get lost in the endeavor and almost forget that what you’re photographing is real–if that makes any sense.  My time in the Canadian Rockies over the past two years reminded me, frequently, to stop, pull myself away from the camera and tripod, and take a good long look around me.  I tried, in fact, to remember to do this regularly.

Whether it was in the meadows near the Banff Airstrip…

Airstrip Meadow, Banff National Park, Alberta

Airstrip Meadow, Banff National Park, Alberta

…or along the shore of Bow Lake…

Crowfoot Mountain from Bow Lake, Banff National Park, Alberta

Crowfoot Mountain from Bow Lake, Banff National Park, Alberta

…in the aspen forest near Pyramid Lake…

Wildland Trail, Jasper National Park, Alberta

Wildland Trail, Jasper National Park, Alberta

…or perched atop the edge of the incomparable Opabin Plateau…

Mary Lake and Lake O'Hara from the Opabin Prospect, Yoho National Park, British Columbia

Mary Lake and Lake O’Hara from the Opabin Prospect, Yoho National Park, British Columbia

…I always tried to take a moment and take a good long, look at my surroundings.  And whenever I did, I was reminded of how the images I was capturing would serve as the visual triggers to the memories that would allow me to relive these magical experiences in the days, months and years to come.

Sunrise, Waterfowl Lakes, Banff National Park, Alberta

Sunrise, Waterfowl Lakes, Banff National Park, Alberta


Responses

  1. This is so beautiful! Wish I could go there, too.

    • Thanks very much!

  2. Wonderful essay and photos, as usual. The photo of Crowfoot Mountain from Bow Lake stopped me in my tracks.

    • Thanks very much, Tom!

  3. Beautiful summation of your two trips to the Canadian Rockies. You are so right about taking the time to not feel rushed, and also taking the time to pull your eye away from the camera and just drink it all in. Your words and photos inspire all of us.

    • Thanks, Ellen!

  4. You have captured the essence of this country well. I am particularly fond of the unique Moraine lake morning shot-not what I usually see and the soft colours moved me.

    • Thanks, Jane.

      There are some really compelling views at Moraine Lake that have nothing to do with the rock pile. It’s worth exploring the shore line along the north side of the lake.

  5. The first and last pictures are epiphanies of pink.

    • Thanks, Steve.

      The literal epiphany, when conditions like those noted arrive, is how everything in the scene is shaded in pinkish light, not just the sky/clouds and their reflections.

  6. Fantastic picture! Wow our Earth is a really beautiful place!

  7. Wonderful post with awesome pictures. Every picture has a splash of colour… The monotones are equally captivating.

    • Thanks very much!

  8. Wow. What a waltz through the Rockies. I was only there once, back in 1972. Your images are just stunning. Grand on a grand scale.

    • Thanks! The Canadian Rockies are, truly, a landscape photography paradise.

      If you’re interested in checking out other Canadian Rockies posts (and there have been quite a few over the past couple of years), go here for a partial list of direct links.

  9. Wow! Amazing view x

  10. Beautiful photographs. You are really lucky to visit these wonderful places. I envy you.

    • Thanks very much. The Canadian Rockies are absolutely breathtaking and I am indeed lucky to have been able to spend time in the region over the past couple of years.

  11. Your photographs are absolutely breathtaking! That is one thing I’d like to take up is to have a photography journey one day soon. For now, my photographs consist of my precious boy….and deer in my yard🙂

    • Thanks.

      I’m sure you’ll get a chance to take a dedicated photo trip some day. But in the meantime, keep working with what’s immediately accessible to you–family members and the (very) local wildlife represent a terrific starting point. Gradually extend that to your neighborhood and a local park or two and, before you know it, the entire world will open up.

      • Thank you! I definitely want to do some photography learning so that I could become a professional photographer. I am amateur, but I practice through trial and error. My blog is new, but I’ll be posting some of my works (hoping to get constructive criticism) to share with others.

        • I’m not a full-time professional, nor have I ever been (I’ve been a “semi-professional” photographer for some time now), but I have many friends and acquaintances who have been or still are full-timers…it’s a very, very difficult way to make a living, and it’s becoming increasingly difficult with each passing month as traditional revenue streams dry up and disappear as the digital revolution marches on. The interrelated keys to success today, arguably, are cultivating a dynamic business acumen and finding a photographic niche for yourself.

          But don’t let my cynicism discourage you.🙂 If this is your dream, go for it; no regrets!

  12. The photos are so stunning! I have been looking for a place to take a trip and these absolutely inspired me.

    • Thanks!

      If you’re looking for a place comprised if incomparable natural beauty, it doesn’t get any better than the Canadian Rockies.

  13. Beautiful photos

    • Thanks very much!

  14. Beautiful photographs.

  15. “..a good photograph is one that communicates,touches the heart,leave the viewers a changed person for having seen it”.. beautiful photographs…..<3.

    • Thank you! That’s high praise indeed.

  16. I love the fact that even the black and white ones are alive and with color. I love black and white because the feeling is completely different to the colored ones. It’s sad but beautiful. They’re gorgeous!!!

    • Thanks very much! And thanks for taking special note of the b/w images as they often fail to produce the impact of the color renditions.

  17. Wow!!!! Fantastic pictures! It’s a place I’ve always wanted to visit and now i might have to go away and show this to my husband to persuade him it’s worth the trip 😀

    • Thanks very much! And if you need some help persuading your husband, let me know.🙂

  18. These photographs are stunning. And my two year old even agrees, she said ooooh and wow-wee and awww….. I will have to read the article later when she’s asleep

    • Thanks! And be sure to tell your two-year-old that she has impeccable taste.🙂

      • She will be asking for weeks to revist – so be sure for more ums and ahhs as she marvels over your spectacular photography…

  19. Very nice!!

  20. Awesome piece,the places are rather captivating

  21. Stunning. Ironically I’m posting about my time in Banff tomorrow! Beautiful pictures, you’ve really captured its beauty.

    • Thanks very much!

      Interesting coincidence re the timing of your forthcoming post and the subject matter. I look forward to reading your impressions of Banff.

  22. wow, absolutely stunning, stunning photos. these are travel brochure quality.

    • “these are travel brochure quality”

      Is that a good thing? 🙂

      Seriously, thanks very much for the kind words. They’re much appreciated.

  23. I live in Canada and I must say the Rockies are very breathtaking! These pictures you took are amazing, and I do hope you keep visiting.

    • Thanks very much for the kind words regarding my photography.

      And, if someone wants to fund my travels, I’ll head back to the Canadian Rockies annually.🙂

      Honestly, even though the exchange rate is as favorable for traveling to Canada from the United States today as has been the case in decades, places like Banff, Lake Louise Village and Jasper seem to be operating on their own special rate of international exchange that defies all ordinary convention. (I assume it’s because they cater so heavily to an international clientele.)

  24. Just beautiful, wish to go there onedsy

  25. Incredible photographs! Beautiful work.

    • Thanks very much!

  26. Great reminders. I finally broke one of my rules of never flying again and gained more time to spend in a particular region and savor it, rather than getting a bit stressed simply getting there. Previous trips seemed to have far too many driving marathons with little time spent enjoying the location I wanted to visit.

    • I really dislike flying to a photo location, primarily because it produces all kinds of potentially significant limitations on what I can bring with me. But if my destination is more than one day’s drive away, I consider flying as a time saver. If it’s more than two days drive, there’s no debate–I always fly.

  27. Great post and great reminder how beautiful our planet is! Thank you for posting this.🙂 I really love your pictures as well! Can I ask what kind of camera you use?🙂

    • Thanks!

      I shoot with a pair of Nikon D800Es (if you’re really interested in knowing about my equipment, go to this page on my website).

  28. Amazing pictures…. A visual treat… Loved it…!!!

    • Thanks very much!

  29. Beautiful pictures! Thanks for sharing

  30. Wow

    • Thanks very much!

  31. Great pics. I am so envious. You are doing what i wish to be doing. Thanks for sharing the pics.

    • Thanks very much, for the kind words and simply taking the time to leave a comment.

  32. Are you an Albertan?🙂 Just wondering or from close by since you have captured the different seasons of Rockies…haven’t seen the deep lush wintery snow in this set.

    But wonderfully done.

  33. nice photo

  34. This is a beautiful. No beauty can be compare with nature. Nice job.

  35. Amazing location and photography🙂

  36. This is incredible! I’ve always wanted to visit the Canadian Rockies.

    • Thanks!

      I hope you get a chance to visit the Canadian Rockies; the region is arguably one of the planet’s most beautiful locations.

  37. Stunning photography. I’m actually hoping to visit the Rockies this summer. All the best. :))

    thetearoomsblog.wordpress.com

    • Thanks very much for the kind words, and I hope you have the opportunity to get to the Rockies this year. I’m sure it will meet, if not exceed, your expectations.

  38. I wish I was there🙂

    • That’s high praise–thanks very much!

  39. Astonishing photos – I’m going to the Rockies in the next couple of months and hope they live up to your photos!! I’ll try and put some shots on my blog (www.roamingfentiger.wordpress.com) but I don’t think they will be anything in comparison. What kind of camera are you using?

    • Thanks! I hope your time in the Canadian Rockies is inspiring; it’s a truly beautiful region.

      I currently shoot with a pair of Nikon D800E DSLRs. If you’re interested in the rest of my gear, check this page on my website:

      http://www.lightscapesphotography.com/gear

      • Brilliant – thanks very much! I’ll have a look. In the meantime, I’m really enjoying your blog too!

        • Thanks! That’s really gratifying to hear.

  40. I am lost for words. Those photos melt my heart, no way I won’t follow you.

    • Thanks, that’s very kind of you.

  41. Incredible Photos! I love the color of water

    • Thanks very much!

  42. Fab!

  43. Wow! I love it! I wish to go there someday.

    • Thanks very much; I hope you have the opportunity.

  44. Ohmygod! These pictures are so captivating!

    • Thanks very much!

  45. Wonderful

  46. No wonder why “travelling” is a part of the conventional pilgrimage … the entire spectacle lifted my spirits . 🙂 keep sharing more🙂

    • Thanks very much! I certainly will continue to to post my images here.

  47. These are beautiful photos! In NYC, the waters are never that clear! Thanks so much for sharing. Guess I will need to visit the Canadian Rockies soon!

    • Thanks! One of the unique facets of the region is that most of the waterways are glacier-fed, so in addition to being pristine, they take on a unique, tealish color. (The Peyto Lake image is a good example of this phenomenon.)

      I hope you do make it to the Canadian Rockies; I assure you, you won’t regret the decision to go.

  48. U take excellent photos

    • Thanks very much!

  49. Amazing photos, such a beautiful place!

  50. Wow! These pictures are amazing!

    • Thanks very much!

  51. It is great to be you

    • Well, I don’t know about that, but thanks.🙂

  52. So very jealous

  53. As a Canadian this is just awesome to see! Reminds me of how wonderful of a country I live in. I use to live really close to scenery like that in B.c. and your photography really triggered some wonderful memories🙂

    I am going to link to your post on my blog. Hopefully this post of yours gets even more recognition.

    Amazingly well done!

    • Thanks very much! I greatly appreciate the kind words.

  54. Reblogged this on thesmilingpilgrim and commented:
    This is my beautiful country and I use to live close to scenery just like this!

    Thanks to the photographer Kerry Mark Leibowitz for such a wonderful blog post!

  55. This place and photo are amazing!

  56. Great Pic

  57. I enjoyed so much your narrative along with the stunning photos. Thank you for sharing.

    • Thanks very much! I really appreciate the kind words.

  58. Simply beautiful. I spent six weeks backpacking, hiking and camping in most of these locations during the summer a decade or so ago. The Canadian Rockies are hard to compete with… so much uninterrupted wilderness. The pictures are excellent; they remind me that I must get back up there again in the near future. I think the spring melt season would be excellent- seeing those large rivers running wild! Thanks for sharing!!

    • Thanks very much. The thing about all those creeks and rivers…most of them seemed to be absolutely roaring in the fall. They must be raging torrents at the height of the spring runoff.

  59. Such a beauty.

  60. This is super cool🙂

  61. The pics are so pretty!!

    • Thanks very much!

  62. Thanks

  63. Beautiful!

  64. So beautiful! I am currently graduating about to intern with our National Parks!

    • Terrific! I wish you the very best of luck.

  65. I like all your picture with grey effect. Because … I like art like that. Btw all the colour are good too !
    Thank you !

    • Thanks very much!

  66. Incredible. Just stunning photos. I’m drawn to black and white, but they were all great. At first, I thought that was a bear in the Mistaya (sp?) Canyon photo. I know what you mean about looking up from the camera every now and again. That’s why I stopped taking photos for a very long time. Having some fun again with it recently.

    • Thanks very much for taking the time to leave a comment.

      No, no bears in any of the photos accompanying this post, but I did see (and photograph) a bear during the most recent trip to the Canadian Rockies; check this link and scroll down a bit.

      • Wow, you look pretty close to that bear! Hope this doesn’t seem too lazy, I’m sure you’ve got it posted on your site, what cameras do you use?

        • I wasn’t that close; I was using a telephoto lens and I cropped the image quite a bit.

          This link to a page on my website should answer all the questions you might have about my equipment; if by some chance it doesn’t, please don’t hesitate to drop me a line.

  67. Absolutely stunning photos!

    • Thanks very much!

  68. Reblogged this on Passionate About Music and commented:
    I hope you don’t mind me sharing this on my blog…I live only 3 hours away from Jasper and many of my blog followers are from other parts of the world…so to share the bit of heaven that is close to home – how can I not?

    • That’s fine. I’m glad you found it worth sharing.

  69. It is just beautiful !💯

    • Thanks very much!

  70. What a beautiful and captivating picture! Simply amazing!

  71. Just visited those places last fall. Now looking at your photos, I suddenly have an urge to go there again!! Beautiful! Thanks for sharing!!

    • Thanks very much–that’s high praise indeed.

  72. Absolutely wonderful.

  73. Kerryl29, I have long since been a photography lover, but have never really managed to actually achieve any good results. Since youre proficient at this, are there any places/websites that you’d suggest to learn how to capture photos better? I mean, some tips and tricks or something?

    • Can you tell me more specifically what you mean when you say that you “have never really managed to actually achieve any good results”? Are the problems technical (i.e. are your images out of focus? Are you having trouble with exposure?) aesthetic (you just don’t like the way they look) or is it a combination of the two? If I have a better sense of the nature of the problem(s) I can probably point you in the right direction.

  74. Kerryl29, the thing is that I’ve never been a big fan of Auto modes on cameras. I generally prefer manually changing the aperture, shuuter speed and exposure. But in the end, I just about never captured an image that actually looked good. So, I believe that my lapse in not knowing how to correctly use these three (aperture, shutter speed and exposure ) is to blame. So yeah, technical problems.

    • Gotcha.

      Check out this blog entry: https://lightscapesphotography.wordpress.com/2013/03/07/approaching-the-scene/

      Let me know if this answers at least some of your questions (it deals with the exposure triad and addresses the question of which part of the triad you’d want to adjust to establish a given exposure baseline). Let me know if this is the kind of thing that you’re struggling with. (This piece doesn’t deal with the issue of how to meter a scene, which is another kettle of fish entirely.)

      One other thing…”exposure” is not a setting–it’s the function of a group of established settings (you’ve got two of them–shutter speed and aperture; the third is ISO). In other words, you set/adjust/establish exposure via the combination of your aperture, shutter speed and ISO choices.

      BTW, I admire your desire to deal with exposure manually. Once you get it down (and you’ll get there, probably sooner than later), you’ll have the world of photographic creativity right at your fingertips.

      • Ooh wow thanks a TON!!! I checked out the link! It was good!
        PS- Keep up the amazing work on your blog

        • Glad you found it useful. Let me know if I can be of further assistance.

  75. Wow, really beautiful photos of one of my favourite areas of the world. I will be sure to keep looking back at these, very inspiring!

    • Thanks very much!

      There are many, many more images from the Canadian Rockies in earlier posts. To find them, simply enter CANADIAN ROCKIES in the search box located in the right-hand sidebar on any page of the blog.

      • I will do that thankyou!

  76. Amazing photos! Once I finish with college my ideal situation will be a traveling trainer so that I can visit places like these.

    • Thanks! And I hope you have the opportunity to visit the Canadian Rockies.

  77. Awesome pics!! Added this to my bucket list

  78. Amazing photos

    Hope you have time to take a look a 360 explore the wildlife outdoors

    • Thanks very much.

      I tried to check your blog but I received a “protected blog” message. It appears that your blog is marked private.

  79. Wow, so beautiful.

  80. Creative lens

  81. Beautiful photos… I’d love to go there one day!

    • Thanks very much! I hope you to have the opportunity to visit the Canadian Rockies.

  82. […] with Brown County State Park last fall–trips to more obviously breathtaking places like the Canadian Rockies or the Oregon Coast haven’t blinded me to that […]

  83. Wonderful post, these pictures are awesome !! I would like tu go to Canada

    • Thanks very much! I hope you have the opportunity to visit the Canadian Rockies.

  84. beutiful Pictures. it is amazing what our Lord has created for us to enjoy

  85. The Rockies really are one of the most beautiful places on earth. You’re photos reflect that.

    • Thanks very much!

  86. You do amazing photographs! Now I can’t wait to go to Canada! I wish I could be closer to the Rockies… but that will have to wait until another time🙂 thanks for your post!😀

    • Thanks!

      I hope you get the chance to visit western Canada at some point.

      I see by your blog that you’ll be at a camp in Maine–serving as a counselor, I assume–this summer. (When I was a kid, many moons ago, I attended camps in New Hampshire and Massachusetts, for a couple of summers.) I trust you’ll have a great experience.

      • You’re welcome 🙂 yup, it’ll be my first year being a counselor so I’m really excited! How did you find being a camper?

        • As best I can recall, I hated it🙂, but I was a really, really little kid at the time. I turned five during the time I was at summer camp the first year and I was six the next time. I was probably too young to be attending a sleep-away camp that lasted for a full month (that was true both years). In fact, in retrospect, I’m surprised that they accepted children my age. But this was roughly 45 years ago.

        • Ouch I kind of get why you hated it, I would’ve hated staying somewhere for a month being that young🙂 the age range I’ll be working with is 7-15 so it’s a little better , fingers crossed anyway🙂

        • I’m sure it’ll be better for you. Best of luck!

  87. Wonderful

  88. Heavenly beautiful…

  89. Very beautiful. Can someone follow me pls I have no followers

  90. The word “snapshot” is inadequate, I know, but its the best any photographer can do in the natural world. Even a “snapshot,” though can be an exquisite reminder of that which cradles our civilization and each one of us. Your photography is a great reminder. Thanks for posting those luscious images.

    • Thanks very much!

  91. Incredible photos, great composition, use of black and white images, and adjustments on shutter speed. This is complete and wonderful to read!


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